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Splash! Chicago

Splash Spring 2016
Course Catalog


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Science Literature, Language, and Writing
Lunch Arts
Humanities Math & Computer Science
Miscellaneous


Arts

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A1506: A New Way to See Movies from Our Past
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

What good are old movies? Some are just plain great movies having terrific performances, great photography and / or writing. (Even in black and white! Even silent!) And some are just crap. But there's another entire use for old movies. Come find out what I mean and see if you really see into our past! Increase your awareness of things present and past!


Prerequisites
None

A1523: What is Classical Music?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Luke Duroc-Danner

Though the story of western music is a long and complex one, this does not mean that the music itself is unapproachable or reserved for a select few devotees. This course aims to make this kind of music more approachable by crashing through the canonical periods of western art music – moving as best as one can from the Renaissance to the birth of modernism– while also trying to address the issue of what is ‘classical’ music and what is its relationship with other musics.


Prerequisites
None

A1536: Visual Art - Painting The Energetic Personal Portrait
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Allison Torem

In this workshop, students will be introduced to how I approach portrait painting:
1) Students will be introduced to the practice of noticing the difference between the abstract idea of a physical feature as they might imagine it and might have drawn features as children, and actually looking at the feature and attempting to represent it on the page.
2) I would also like to introduce students, or, perhaps more appropriately, to reintroduce students, to the joy and freedom in drawing and painting: a portrait does not need to capture a photographic truth-- that is what pictures are for. Instead, drawn and painted portraits can capture motion, essence, personality, and connection between subject and artist.
3) Students will be introduced to the "art" of "the blind portrait"- drawing someone without looking at the page! Building off these principals, I would like to introduce students to the FUN and MEANING in painting a portrait from life and actually drawing based on your connection with your subject, as you see the subtleties in the way their bodies and faces gesture as they communicate with you, rather than a stilted fraction of themselves you might get from a stabler source to render, like a photo.
There is value in connecting with your subject and producing a portrait which is no, not necessarily flattering, but brings to the page something about who they are in front of you in life.

Come try to paint a portrait by having fun!


Prerequisites
An interest in drawing/painting portraits!

A1539: ACTING CLASS!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Allison Torem

I will bring my professional Chicago film and theater experience to this workshop. We will review some of my basic tenants of acting, such as authenticity of self, trust and confidence, and reacting and staying present.


Prerequisites
An interest in human behavior AND/OR interest in acting.

A1526: Introduction to Music Analysis
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Luke Duroc-Danner

Have you ever wondered how exactly composers create the many effects in their music? This class will begin to answer that question by giving you the tools to explore 'under the hood' of the music. While there are many different systems of musical analysis, this class will focus on one of the most traditional systems: tonal analysis.


Prerequisites
Ability to read music

A1537: The Short Film Script
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Allison Torem

In this class students will be introduced to a version of the brainstorming and development process toward writing a short film script and with basic familiarity with traditional screenplay format and lingo.
Students will leave with an idea for their own short script. Students will have a chance to ask me questions about my experiences working in film and as a short filmmaker and in development of my first feature script.


Prerequisites
Interest in screenwriting/filmmaking!

A1514: Painting Their Own Reality: A (Very) Brief Overview of the World's Greatest Women Artists
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Treber

Picasso. Monet. Van Gogh. Da Vinci. Most of history's "greatest" artists have had one major thing in common: they're all men. The art world has done a lot to exclude women for many years, but that doesn't mean that men are the only artists with the capacity for greatness. In this course, we'll examine some of the greatest women to ever pick up a paintbrush. These artists succeeded against all odds and found success in a world that wanted them to fail. We'll talk about artists such as Artemisia Gentileschi, Mary Cassatt, Rosa Bonheur, Frida Kahlo, Lee Krasner, Georgia O'Keefe, Barbara Kruger, Judy Chicago, and/or Cindy Sherman. We'll learn how these women made use of their femininity to depict their reality as women in a "man's world," shaping the world of art and defining what it means to be a great artist.


Humanities

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H1532: Age of Empires: The Roots of the First World War
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tim Hofmockel

WWI is an excellent case study for great power politics, and a lot of the complexities of the causes of the war are not well explained in high school. Nationalism, industrialization, and the complex politics of the Balkans are not taught nearly as much as the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand and the alliance system that also triggered the war. This course would focus on trends from the late 1800s up until 1914.

H1528: The Economics of Discrimination
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dan Ehrlich

What are the forms and origins of racial segregation? Using game theory and economic intuition, explore the works of economists Gary Becker and Thomas Schelling to understand racism in the workplace, affirmative action, and housing policy.


Prerequisites
Basic economic knowledge is highly suggested.

H1520: The Funny Business! An Intro to Film Comedy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Shimmel

Ever wanted to know about the first comedy films, or when they were made? How about the types of sight gags used by silent-era comedians like Charlie Chaplin? Or even the history of cartoons, from Steamboat Willie to Steven Universe? Look no further! This class will provide a brief introduction to the various eras and types of film comedy, and we'll investigate together just what has made each one possible.

H1507: How to Succeed with Bosses and Bureaucrats
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bill Geraci

(This is a class which you’ll use likely daily for the rest of your life!) We all live in hierarchical structures: Work, family, school…. What patterns should you watch for and which tactics should you take to help your point win the day? Come learn some of the tactics used by bad bosses…and some history, too!


Prerequisites
None

H1509: The three great American lies
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

Come learn why all hierarchical societies (and what *that* means) must be based on lies. Briefly consider historical examples. Then explore the three greatest lies of our own society and how they show up throughout our lives. See if you agree! Understand what to watch for to understand how you’re being manipulated and therefore how to avoid it. And a new way to see what goes on around you.


Prerequisites
None

H1552: What is Gender?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lauren Daurizio

Why do we have genders? Is having genders a good thing? Where do genders come from? How do we teach people to have them? And how do transgender people fit into this?

This class will be a brief overview of some different ways that gender had been thought of, and what gender means in our society.

H1505: How Mechanics Influence Music
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

Everyone knows (or has heard) Bach’s Toccata in D minor. But did you know that piece of music teaches about the nature of Baroque music? And why it was eventually replaced by Romantic music? The mechanism itself (pipe organs in this case) shapes what kind of music we get…and, of course, the money…. Come learn all about this.


Prerequisites
None

H1538: A Broken System: Everything Wrong with American Democracy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alec Collins

This course will examine how the structure of the American political system is not conducive to democratic governance of a modern state. We will examine the United States Constitution, Federalist Papers, and other information about our political institutions and trace how their nature has led the hyper-partisanship, political apathy, and demagoguery that currently characterize our government, especially in the most recent election cycle.


Prerequisites
Middle School Civics (three branches of government, etc.)

H1512: The Actual Nature of Human Nature
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

Why do people act the way do? Tired of theories which don't work in the real world? Come hear Bill Geraci's answers to these eternal questions!


Prerequisites
None


Literature, Language, and Writing

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L1502: Words, Sounds and History: A Grimm Affair
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yash Sinha

If you were a member of an alien species that had come to Earth and had only been given a bunch of languages, how much do you think you'll be able to figure out about the history of their speakers? Probably a little more than you believe.

In this class, we will look at the development of some sounds in the English language (specifically the Grimm's law) and see what they can tell us about the history of English speakers. We'll also try to figure out why these sounds developed the way they did. However you are strictly advised not to try to do this outside class because that will involve repeating funny sounds which may or may not get you weird stares from strangers.

L1530: How to Speak Shakespeare
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Char Daston

Have you ever wanted to speak the speeches of Hamlet or wow audiences as Juliet in the balcony scene? This quick crash course will teach you all about the tiny clues Shakespeare left in the wording, meter, and punctuation of his plays. You'll learn how actors use those clues to figure out what characters are thinking and feeling, and get a chance to read some Shakespearian speeches yourself!


Prerequisites
Know what iambic pentameter means. Having read or seen a Shakespeare play is helpful but not required.

L1517: Rap in Chicago: Analyzing the City's Portrayal in Rap Music
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Daniel Lopez

Rap music, with all of its negative connotations, continues to be one of the most misunderstood art forms. Similarly, the city of Chicago is one of the most misunderstood places to live in. In an effort to combat these misconceptions, this class will consist of comparing the lyrics of several Chicago rappers and addressing the images their lyrics portray. With this new understanding, students will be able to apply it to their own lives, making an effort to combat misconceptions for the betterment of Chicago.


Lunch

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L1501: Lunch Period
Difficulty: None
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period on each day of the program.


Literature, Language, and Writing

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L1543: Reading as a Writer - Short Stories
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kelsey Schmitt

In this class, we will learn to read as writers, examining text to discover how it works. But this class moves beyond typical analysis to ask: what makes a story good? How can we write the kind of story we want to? What's the point of writing? This course will explore how authors use language through close reading of a short story and discuss how we might use language in our own stories.

L1531: Poem Parodies
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Char Daston

In this course, you'll learn about great poetry by learning to make fun of it. We'll read famous poems, and learn about the various ways they've been parodied, imitated, or (lovingly) mocked. We'll discuss what makes these poems great, and what makes them so...mockable. You'll also have some time to write parody poems of your own, and to share them.


Prerequisites
Know about simile, metaphor, sonnet, and free verse.

L1548: Intro Phonetics/Phonology
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alexandra Kapadia

Interested in the science behind language? Come learn about the branch of linguistics that deals with sound production and organization and how sound encodes meaning.


Prerequisites
None

L1515: Soundless but Not Silent: Intro to American Sign Language
Difficulty: **

Come learn a new language, where you can converse after only a few lessons! ASL is a gestural language spoken mainly by the Deaf in the United States. We will review basic grammar, vocabulary, finger spelling, numbers, and cultural lessons on the Deaf community. You will have the opportunity to practice your signing skills, learn any words you might be curious about, and watch the art forms of ASL poetry, song and dance. American Sign Language is easy, fun and exciting to learn, but most importantly of all- it allows you access to the complex and rich world of the Deaf. No previous knowledge necessary, just come with ready hands.

L1535: Zeus...Is the Father
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sonya Wang

Ever wondered how messed up Greek mythology is? Or seen some parallels between Greek myths and modern day stories? Or you just happen to really like Greek myths in general? Introducing Greek myths with tropes, rated G to M depending on the audience.


Math & Computer Science

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M1503: Adventures in Probability
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alan Zhong

We live in a world of probabilities. Whether we recognize it or not, in our day to day lives we all make choices seeking out certainty, but settling for likeliness. In this class, I'll teach you probability intuitively so that when you leave my class, you'll be able to recognize and apply mathematical concepts in your everyday life. (No math prerequisite or knowledge is required)

M1550: Encryption and Cyber Warfare in the Digital Age
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Austin Byers

We live in a Digital Age, where more and more of our lives are kept in computers and in the cloud. Encryption makes this possible, protecting everything from email to online banking. Yet almost every day we hear about yet another data breach where hackers steal sensitive data like credit card numbers. How does this happen? What can we do to protect ourselves?

In the first half of the course, we explore what encryption means and how it works. Starting with the very first ciphers and working right up to modern cryptography, we'll take a look at the mathematical foundations of encryption. Learn how early cryptanalysts broke Caesar and Vigenère ciphers and how the Internet is made secure today with streaming ciphers and RSA public-key/private-key infrastructure.

In the second half of the course, we'll discuss (and even demo!) real cyber attacks. Whether you're building a website, running a server, or simply reading your email, learn how you can protect yourself from code injection, vulnerability scanning, social engineering, password cracking, and more!


Prerequisites
Basic mathematical and technical familiarity is helpful, but not required.

M1522: Set Cardinality and the Multiple Levels of Infinity
Difficulty: **

It is not hard to see that the sets $$\{1,2,3\}$$ and $$\{4,5,6\}$$ are both the same size because they each have three elements. However, what about the set of even numbers and the set of negative number or the set of whole numbers and the set of fractions? It turns out that there is a very nice definition for the size of a set that will answer these questions and more, giving us much deeper understanding of the concept of infinity. These ideas helped to shape modern mathematics, but are not too difficult for a high school mathematics student to understand.

Note that if you took this class with me for droplet, this will repeat the same material, so I'd recommend you take a different class instead.


Prerequisites
None

M1516: Proving Limits
Difficulty: **

$$1,\frac12,\frac13,\frac14,\frac15,...$$ It is clear that this sequence of numbers will get closer and closer to zero. Thus it makes sense to say that the "limit" is zero. But how do we prove this fact? This question is not as easy as it sounds, and for this reason, it took many years for mathematicians to agree on a good definition for what constitutes a limit. We now have the so called "epsilon-delta" definition, which is well known for confusing first year math students across the country. My goal is to not only explain the epsilon-delta definition of limits, but to describe why such a definition makes complete sense. This is a great introduction to proof based mathematics.

M1518: Basics of High Speed Computing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Paul Gauthier

Computers keep getting faster and faster, but how exactly is that happening. In this class we will look at some of the basic methods computer scientists use to make computers perform tasks more quickly.


Prerequisites
Some background in computer science preferable but not necessary.


Science

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S1521: Nature's Travelers: The How, Where, and Why of Amazing Animal Migrations
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Schumm

Where do birds go during the winter? The ancient Greeks explained the disappearance of certain kinds of birds during the winter by suggesting that they magically transformed into other kinds of birds. Today we know that’s not true–the strategies animals have evolved for escaping the changing of the seasons are, in some ways, far more unbelievable. From shorebirds that can fly nonstop for over 6,000 miles; to monarch butterflies and their yearly trips to the few, relatively tiny patches of fir trees in Mexico where they spend the winter months; to swarms of near-microscopic ocean-dwelling animals called zooplankton that swim a vertical distance of 3,000 feet each day to find food, animals are willing to go the distance against all odds in order to survive and pass on their genes. In this class we’ll learn all about amazing animal migrations, the risks and rewards of these long journeys, and how animals’ migrations are an important part of our global ecosystem.


Prerequisites
A general interest in weird and unique animals! Also, some familiarity with geography and high-school biology is recommended.

S1554: Climate Change Science
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elizabeth Berg

An introduction to climate change from multiple angles. We'll talk about what people mean when they say the planet is warming, and then discuss both scientific and policy ways to address it. Bring your questions and opinions!

S1555: Marine Biology and Climate Change
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Clio Macrakis

The oceans hold an amazing diversity of organisms! We will cover a range of marine biology topics including the biology, chemistry, and physics behind different ecosystems. Marine biology is fun! Unfortunately, climate change is not. Learn about how climate change is affecting the oceans and what people are doing about it.

S1544: NeuroImaging: Current Research Methods and the Future State-of-the-Art
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Elliot Layden

This course will cover recent advances in neuroimaging, addressing the applications of research tools such as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI), dense-array electroencephalograph (EEG), and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). We will also focus on how connectivity analyses can be applied to each of these research methodologies. Finally, we will discuss potential state-of-the-art techniques of the future, which are currently under development, including Diffuse Optical Tomography/Imaging (DOT) and nanoparticles for biomedical imaging.


Prerequisites
Some minor background in mathematics, biology, and physics is suggested but not required.

S1553: First Aid
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Preethi Raju

Oh no! Someone you know is having an allergic reaction. Bu wait- good thing you went to the First Aid class! You know how to use your friend's epi pen to save them!

To learn how to respond in emergency situations like this one and more (from bleeding to losing consciousness) come to this class!


Prerequisites
None

S1527: The Birth, The Life And The Death Of The Universe
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cagan Sengul

Our universe came into existence 13.7 billion years ago. We now call it "The Big Bang". But it was not just "big", it was "everywhere". Moreover, it was not just a "bang", it was a "stretch". Although "The Everywhere Stretch" is not a catchy name for it.
In this class, we will read the biography for our universe. We will start from its birth, then tell the story of how it evolved into the universe in which we live and love. (The whole universe was orange at some point in its evolution!)
Then we will cover how our universe will look like in the distant future (not thousands, not millions, but billions of years later). Eventually we will learn about how it will die, this time not with a bang but with a whimper.

S1519: Introduction to Forecasting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Millman

Do you want to learn how to forecast the weather? This is a class for you to be able to impress your friends with. Challenge the TV meteorologists with your own forecasts, and bet your friends on whether or not you'll have a snow day!


Miscellaneous

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X1533: Oh the HumaniTEA!
Difficulty: *

Few beverages can be said to have inspired wars, espionage, and war. Even fewer drinks have played a central role in both world history and modern culture. Come learn about the world's most consumed beverage - tea!

In this class, we'll be answering pressing questions, such as: How do I brew the perfect cup of tea? And what exactly is oolong, anyways?

Besides covering the science, history, and culture of tea, we'll be tasting varieties from around the world. Come experience different ways of drinking tea, from the traditional Chinese tea ceremony to British high tea (with scones, of course!).


Prerequisites
No previous tea experience required.

X1549: Land Navigation and Military Map Reading
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sarah Starr

What if your life depended on your ability to navigate with a map and compass? Would you find yourself more alone than you’d hoped?
The ability to navigate terrain with a map and compass is a skill-set that’s become lost in recent years due to technological advances like GPS and its integration into our phones.

Learn how to read a map including using a compass, computing distance, identifying terrain features and getting a pace count. Then put your expertise to practice with a land navigation challenge!

X1540: Introductory Microeconomics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dimitry Karavaikin

Introduction to what economics is
Concept of scarcity
Free rider problem
Moral hazard
Different types of goods: public, luxury, normal, inferior
Price and cross price elasticity of demand
Cover positive and negative externalities
Implications for Government policies

X1547: Chicago's Ghosts
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rebekah Lippens

Chicago is a city of many stories--some of them spookier than others. We will examine some of the city's most famous ghost stories and use them as a jumping off point for a larger discussion of how we evaluate stories about the paranormal and what it means to have "proof."

X1556: The Memecosystem
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Megan Belzner

The meme ecosystem, or memecosystem, controls the internet at the highest level. Come explore it! We'll discuss what memes are, where they come from, and what makes a good meme, with plenty of examples along the way.


Prerequisites
None, but knowing about some existing memes will make discussion more interesting.

X1541: History of Radical LGBTQ Activism in the United States
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sara Rubinstein

Compton's Cafeteria Riot. The Vanguard. Stonewall. STAR. Sylvia Rivera. Marsha P Johnson. ACT UP. Queer Nation. The Combahee River Collective. BYP100. And many more!

Queer people in the United States have been pushing the boundaries to fight for liberation and justice throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. This class will highlight some key radical LGBTQ-centered organizations, people, and actions; with an emphasis on people and groups who are often ignored or erased in mainstream histories.


Prerequisites
A basic knowledge of LGBTQ identities and terminology would be helpful, but you certainly don't need to be an expert!

X1551: US Army Basic Tactics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Garrett Healy

Interested in knowing how the US Army trains its soldiers on battle tactics? Want to know what maneuvers are happening in Band of Brothers, Black Hawk Down, and more? This course will give you a basic introduction into the structure of Army squad and platoon maneuvers.

Learn about ambushes, raids, reacting to contact, and more!

X1513: SAT Prep
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anoushka Chowdhary

Learn tips and tricks to ace your SATs! We will focus specifically on the Critical Reading and Writing sections and will work through sample papers and questions. The goal is to teach you how to pick answers and use the test format to your advantage. Some topics that will be covered are:
1. How to answer vocabulary questions without memorizing the dictionary?
2. How to prep for the essay writing part of the test?
3. How to answer the Critical Reading questions?

X1529: Emergency Medicine & CPR Course
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ivy Sandquist

Come learn the fundamentals of emergency medicine with the University of Chicago Emergency Medical Services! In a crash course designed to pass on some of our most essential skills, we will be teaching you how to 1) recognize when someone is seriously hurt, 2)s tart providing them emergency care while you wait for the ambulance to arrive 3) how to perform citizen CPR. These crucial skills may not only help you save a life - they could get you started down a career path as well! Don't let yourself be a helpless bystander - learn what it takes to make a difference today!

X1542: Introduction to American Government
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kelsey Schmitt

This course will offer an overview of the form and philosophy of the American government from a primarily historical and legal perspective. We will cover the branches of government and the powers they hold, the Constitution, and the shifts in the practice of government that have occurred in new laws, presidencies, court cases, etc. At the end, the class may discuss their opinions of the American system of government and broader theories of government.