Splash! Fall 2013
Course Catalog


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Lunch (Free!) Connect@Splash!
Art, Music, and Performance Thought, Culture, and Society
Sports and Hobbies Literature, Language, and Writing
Math and Computers Science


Connect@Splash!

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@1243: Connect@Splash!
Difficulty: *
Teachers:

Connect@Splash is Splash!'s brand-new student and teacher lounge where you can connect with teachers after class, meet other Splash! students and check out cool activities. This is the place to go if you arrive late, if none of the classes offered during a block appeal to you, or if you want to take a break during the day. While you can sign-up ahead of time, feel free to also show up whenever.


Lunch (Free!)

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*1242: Lunch
Difficulty: **
Teachers:

Please join us for lunch in Ida Noyes Hall! Connect@Splash! will continue in this space, so you can have lunch with your teachers and classmates! Lunch will include pizza and soda, and it is free.


Art, Music, and Performance

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A1126: What really happened to Van Gogh? A Post-Impressionism Exploration
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lily Chen

Examine the life of Van Gogh through his works of art! From sunflowers to self-portraits, Starry Night to a field of crows, figure out what really happened to Van Gogh from the moment of birth to the cutting of an ear to the final tragic moments of his death.

A1151: Comics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Lu

Love reading comics? Ever wanted to write them? Well then, whether you love drawing Batman, reading manga, or picking out the funnies in the newspaper, then this is the class for you!

In this class we will learn about the basics of graphic narrative/sequential art (fancy names for comic art) and then put it into practice by drawing our own comics!


Prerequisites
A nutritious and balanced interest in comics

A1120: Improv it Up!
Difficulty: *

Do you like making things up on the spot? Improv it Up! introduces students to improvisational drama, which is essentially acting without a script. We will spend most of the class doing creative improv exercises (like my personal favorite, Bus Stop, where people have different weird characters and have to interact together). A sense of humor is essential and everyone will participate!

A1177: Bust Out Those Bollywood Moves: A Crash Course in South Asian Dance Styles

Have you ever listened to a Bollywood song and wanted to bust out those moves? Have you ever watched a music video and wished you could look as confident and smooth as those actors? Well, this class is for you!! We will be teaching you some of the most up-to-date moves rocking the Bollywood film industry this season. Wear loose-fitting clothes and comfortable shoes, and be prepared to MOVE!!


Prerequisites
None!

A1229: Aca-Awesome: An Introduction to Collegiate A Cappella
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jessica Goodman

You don’t need to watch Glee or Pitch Perfect to feel a part of the a cappella lifestyle—you can actually live it! It Members of the UChicago a capella group “Rhythm and Jews” will show you what it takes. Be prepared to learn the vocal warm-ups and exercises, how to sing together, and even a few short songs. We will also talk about the history of a cappella and look at what some groups are doing today. It’ll be "Aca-awesome!"

A1241: You Say You Want A Revolution: An Historical Look at Music Propelling Politics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexa Daugherty

Oh Picket lines and picket signs/ Don't punish me with brutality/ Talk to me so you can see/ What's going on – from What’s Going On by Marvin Gaye (1971)

From the Rolling Stones to Kendrick Lamar, music reflects and shapes the political structure from which it originates. We'll analyze lyrics, songs, and artists from an anthropological viewpoint. We'll also discuss the idea of a 'song' dynamically—as a function of artist, structure, lyrics, and social context—more than just as a ‘rad’ mp3.

A1166: Acrobatics 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Karlyn Gorski

In this class, students will learn the basics of partner and group acrobatics, including shoulder sits, thigh stands, various pyramid structures, front angels, and more!


Prerequisites
Students should wear comfortable athletic clothing, be in good physical condition, and come prepared to move

A1140: How To Read Music
Difficulty: *
Teachers: David Mao

What do those dots and lines actually mean? For centuries, musicians have used a musical staff consisting of five lines and dots that are connected to each other with stems to represent the highest and lowest pitches, the longest and shortest notes, and the most simple and the most complicated musical works. Join in as we learn how to make read the parade of notes found in music we know and love.

A1165: Impromptu: Speaking Under Pressure
Difficulty: **

Have you ever been put on the spot and don’t know what to say? Have you ever wondered how public speakers mesmerized crowds? Do you have what it takes to master the art of bullsh*tting? Then Impromptu is for you! Learn the tips, tricks and technics used in the national competition of Academic Decathlon to excel in Impromtu, public speaking on the go. Join us for a session of much ado about something!


Prerequisites
Willingness and enthusiasm to improve your public speaking skills.

A1224: Circus!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jay Feldman

We do circus. Some may think circus is just a bunch of tricks, but like any other art form it is a performance. So come one, come all as we show you the theatrical side of juggling, poi, and acrobatics—you can even learn a few tricks along the way!


Prerequisites
NONE! Everybody can do this.

A1139: How to Write With Flair: An Introduction to Western Calligraphy
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Harini Jaganathan

Have you ever wondered how the Declaration of Independence was written so beautifully before the age of typewriters and computers? In this session, we will go through some of the basic technicalities of calligraphy, look at some popular calligraphic alphabets, and start practicing the art of calligraphy. Learn how to impress your friends and family with beautiful handmade birthday cards and more.

A1217: Selfies: From Renaissance Paintings to Instagram
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Li

Throughout history, people have found it important to capture images of themselves, whether on canvas, film, or photo. Why do we take selfies, what are we trying to say about ourselves, and what are we *actually* saying about ourselves?

A1129: Throw Down: An Introduction to Slam Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lauren McMann

Speaking to some of the greatest social injustices of our time, slam poetry seeks to be a channel through which young people can express themselves through the spoken word. Rather than the typical pentameter of older forms of poetry, the "slam" style of poetry draws its inspiration from movement and rhythm (much like the rap music of today). In this course, you will watch and be inspired by varied examples of slam poetry and then create a powerful piece of your very own.

A1230: What's in a light?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jason McCreery

What does every performing art need? Lights! Otherwise you couldn't see anything! And that's bad! In this brief workshop, we will cover some basic instruments in theaters, how they work, as well as a quick overview of color theory.


Thought, Culture, and Society

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C1227: How to Be a Monster
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Pete Brooks

“Bring something incomprehensible into the world!” (Gilles Deleuze)
Monsters are powerful, destructive, and terrifying. What’s even more unsettling is that monsters are always mysterious; they can’t be understood. How does stuff that's weird, gross, scary, supernatural, or confusing challenge us in thinking about our world? Can it sometimes be good to be lost, disoriented, and frightened? Topics may include ticks, wolves, the Pink Panther, blackheads, fractal being, lobsters, and Patti Smith.


Prerequisites
Come prepared for an open-minded discussion, ready to ask questions and share your own ideas.

C1118: Zen Buddhism: What Is It?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jake Bittle

Q: What is the mind of Buddha? A: That palm tree in the front yard. This is the logic of Zen Buddhism: paradoxical, fascinating, like no other religion. We will investigate Zen koans (riddles with no answer), eccentric behavior of Zen masters, readings from sutras, and basic Zen meditative practices (with a brief attempt at meditation).

C1238: Cultural Psychology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vo Ram Yoon

Culture can be defined as a collection of behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular group of people. From your local Chinatown to the Hispanic community, there are obvious differences from one culture to another. However, do these differences amount to anything more besides distinct cuisines and holidays or can they influence the way we actually think? By examining some psychological experiments, we will explore how culture can affect memory, emotions, and other facets of the mind.

C1164: From Queen to Queen: The Evolution of the British Monarchy from Victoria to Elizabeth II
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nishanth Iyengar

The title says it all. This class is for those who, like me, are fascinated (read: obsessed) by the history of the British Monarchy in the last two centuries and the rapid change it has experienced in that time, and would like to learn more. The basics and family trees will of course be covered, along with some lesser-known details that you might find interesting. I assure you that this will very informative to all you history buffs out there.


Prerequisites
A basic knowledge of the family trees of the Houses of Hanover and Saxe-Coburg-Gotha/Windsor (with regard to their pertinence to the British Royal Family). A passion for the history of the British Monarchy. An ability to sit through a two-hour lecture on the subject.

C1245: Personality Psychology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cindy Wang

The world is full of people like you... but there also exponentially more people very different from you. Ever wonder why that is? Are you more of the quiet one in class who would rather read books or do you prefer putting yourself out there and speaking up in group settings? Do you like to make decisions based on solid facts or do you prefer to go with your gut instincts?This class will teach you why you are the way you are by learning more about the famous Myers-Briggs personality test.

C1235: Death Trolleys, Broken Ships and Stupid Chickens
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Victor Zhang

Would you kill one person to save five from being run over by a heavy trolley? If all parts of a ship replaced gradually, would it still be the same ship? How do you know tomorrow you suddenly won't wake up discovering you're a chicken?

We will learn about the thought experiments in philosophy, and discuss three famous examples of them - The Trolley Problem, The Ship of Theseus, and Russell's Chickens, and see how they question our ideas of morality, identity and knowledge.


Prerequisites
None!

C1200: Economic Competition: Cartels Are Not Magic
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Thomas Lee

What happens when one person controls the supply of a good? And when a new challenger approaches to try to also supply that good, how does that affect the price of the good and the welfare of the consumers? We investigate monopolies and their related cousin, oligopolies, to build a basic framework of economic competition. We will also apply Bertrand and Cournot models of oligopolies onto a popular TV show to colorfully and critically examine the adverse effects of stifled competition.

C1223: Cybercrimes
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Glen Wang

Identity theft, credit card fraud and money laundering are some of the fastest-growing areas of crime in the world. How do these criminals use illegally-gained information to steal money from people and businesses? How can businesses and governments work together to stop them? More importantly, what can we do to protect our own information?

C1197: Globalization & its Demons
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Yandy Alcala

This course serves as an introduction to the contemporary phenomenon of globalization and its effects, or implications, for both "developed" and "developing" countries. With a particular emphasis on the inequality produced by the new global order, we focus on separating theory from practical, "lived", reality. In our analysis, we will pay special attention to social actors: institutions of global governance (IMF, WB, UN, NGOs), governments, and indigenous groups.


Prerequisites
An interest in learning about contemporary global issues.

C1226: Schizophrenia: Philosophy and Politics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Pete Brooks

Hallucinations, delusions, psychosis... We're both confused and fascinated by the experiences of people labeled "schizophrenic", but why? What can schizophrenia teach us about ourselves? Why do we label some people "sane" and others "insane"? And what can an "abnormal" view to the world show us about our own lives? We'll think about schizophrenia as a cultural phenomenon––not just as a clinical diagnosis––taking film, literature, philosophy, and case studies as our guides.

C1232: Paradoxes of Voting
Difficulty: **

In this class, we'll uncover democracy's dirty secrets. What different ways can we count votes, and what are their strengths and weaknesses? What does it mean for an election to be fair? When making a decision with a bunch of people, it might seem most fair to have a vote. But in many ways, elections don't work the way you expect. If you are trying to hold an election between three candidates, no election system that you or anyone else can come up with can ever be fair. Elect to take our class!

C1233: Get a Life: Having a Life vs. Merely Living
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Fox

In ancient ethics, we find one idea consistently emphasized: that while all animals are capable of living, humans alone are able to really have a life. In this class, we’ll look into the nature of this distinction and try to figure out why it’s so important to ethical reflection.

C1178: Controlling a Society
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Noelle Turtur

How does a government control a society? How does it come into power and keep its power? How does it control, not only what people do, but also their thoughts, perceptions, and desires?
This class will use 20th C. Italy (fascist Italy and post-war Italy) as a case study in order to examine the strategies used by governments to permeate a society, and, in essence, control a people. The specific case study will serve as background for a discussion of power and control in society.


Prerequisites
None.

C1114: The Promise and Perils of Genetically Modified Foods
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Chelsea Kendall

Thanks to recent developments in biotechnology, scientists have produced tomatoes that don't rot, corn resistant to drought and herbicides, and extra-nutritious high-yield rice. These technologies hold tremendous promise for feeding the world in an era of climate change and growing populations--yet public acceptance is a long ways away. Come dissect the debate, and learn a little anthropology on the way.


Prerequisites
None!

C1184: The Art and Science of Pie
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Abigail LaPier

Ahhh, the never-ending quest for buttery, flaky perfection! Even without a Midwestern grandmother, you can become a pastry master. This class will go over the theoretical aspects of perfect pastry, from crust to filling, then include demos for mixing, rolling, and shaping dough. Finally, students will try their hand at making simple pie dough. In addition to traditional dessert pies, we will also discuss hand pies, free-form tarts, savory pies, and puff pastry.


Prerequisites
Experience with baking; enthusiasm for eating pastry

C1234: Irreplaceable
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Fox

It seems natural to say, of a particularly beloved individual, that he or she is irreplaceable to you. But what exactly do we mean when we use irreplaceable in this sense? And how does the possibility of this sort of irreplaceability change the way we think about the good life?

C1225: God is Dead
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Taylor Coplen

What did Nietzsche mean when he said “God is dead”? We will consider the meaning of his famous quote in light of more recent literature, examining the context of his quote and evaluate modern interpretations from prominent philosophical thinkers. This will not be a class on religion and the existence or nonexistence of God will be completely irrelevant to our discussion. Rather, we will discuss the extent to which a belief in God or gods plays a role in structuring one’s experience of the world.

C1204: YOU'RE A PUNK!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Usman Akhter

What makes someone a punk? What ideologies do punk musicians, in particular, have? We'll focus on punk music to look at themes of youth, anti-authority, anti-consumerism, left-wing/anarchist political views. We might identify some lesser known punks in the process.

C1237: "I don't have a body, I am a body" : On/Within a Bodily Existence
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Seong-Ah Cho

Temple. Prison. Mask. Home.

The body and bodily existence have fascinated and devastated humankind from time (probably) immemorial. In this class, we will explore what science, philosophy, and our own experiences reveal about how human sentience—our conscious experience of the world—is inextricably embedded in the realities of an unmistakably physical body. Pain, personality, beauty, meaning, death, and freedom will take center stage as we reflect on existence bound only / totally by "flesh."


Prerequisites
No prerequisites but note focus of class is evolutionary/behavioral science and psychophysiology — will take as basic scientific premise that human experience of external reality is mediated by a physical body, not a metaphysical soul.

C1189: Theories of Justice
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Christopher Natoli

Would you sacrifice one person to save five? How do you decide? The person to be sacrificed has as much right to live as the five. Yet sacrificing the one lets more people live happy lives.

In this class, we'll talk about different theories of justice to help us answer tough questions like this. After thinking about moral philosophy, we'll see how (or if!) it helps us construct a just society.


Prerequisites
A passion for doing the right thing.

C1122: The Greatest Good for the Greatest Number? An Introduction to Utilitarianism
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Boyajian

How does one determine right from wrong? Two centuries ago, the philosopher Jeremy Bentham proposed a solution: an action is considered good if the pleasure that it produces outweighs the pain. In this class, we will examine this theory, known as utilitarianism, and debate whether it is possible to quantify pleasure and pain in the manner that Bentham proposed. We will also examine some criticisms of utilitarianism in order to arrive at our conclusion about how to determine right from wrong.

C1123: A history of the destruction of Art
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Douglas Graebner

Why do people destroy art? How does it happen? How should our study of present and past art be shaped by this? This course will be a history of how art has been destroyed, altered, defaced or reshaped throughout human history. Topics covered will include political action, religious shifts(especially iconoclasm but also changes in doctrine), changes in fashion, public morals, and last but not least art made to be destroyed.

C1134: UChicago: A History
Difficulty: *

How did the University of Chicago grow from a 10-acre plot of land to the sprawling campus it is today? Why does the Midway slope down, and why are the streets around campus so hard to navigate by car? Whose ghosts haunt campus? ...And what's with the Max Palevsky dorms? Find out the answers to these questions and more on this walking history/urban design tour of the UChicago campus!


Prerequisites
Wear comfortable walking shoes.

C1136: What is Human Nature?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jonathon Catlin

“Oh, that’s just human nature,” people sometimes say—as if it we all agreed on what human nature is! Philosophers have disagreed about what human beings are naturally like and how they naturally act for thousands of years. In this class, we will sketch out several theories of the “state of nature"—how people lived before civilization—proposed by the philosophers Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Hobbes, and Rousseau, and discuss what they mean for how we should live our lives and structure our societies.

C1138: The Game of Soccer: Nationalism and Integration in the Modern Era
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Walter Quintanilla

The role of soccer in the modern era reflects monumental historical events, stories of violence, and struggles for social acceptance. This class will focus on the social implications of soccer through history. From its growth among labor workers in England, to its immortalization of social strife, and finally to questions of racial acceptance. We will look at soccer outside of the 90 minutes and outside of the pitch.


Prerequisites
curiosity and a love for the beautiful game

C1143: How to Win with Teachers and Bosses
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

We all live in hierarchical structures: Schools, work, family…. What tactics can you use to gain advantage against--or work better within--groups? And some history, too!

C1155: Foundations of Leadership
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nathan Hauke

Do you want to LEAD? Leadership opportunities abound, but only some choose to take on the challenge of becoming a leader. Will you? Leadership relies much less on controlling others as it does on controlling yourself. Leading is not just an action, it can be a lifestyle. Adjusting your mindset today can help you make a difference tomorrow.

C1158: Breadwinners and superwoman: the role of women
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Natasha Harnwell

Women are on the rise! Are men losing ground? Who is a feminist anyways? This class will consider the current status of women. We will explore issues surrounding jobs and income, marriage, and education. What does it mean that women earning more money than ever but on average earning 20 cents less than men? Why are fewer women getting married and why are women doing so well in schools? This class is open to both genders and will be a blend of student discussion and teacher presentation.

C1163: Was Shakespeare Shakespeare
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jake Howry

He has been called the Soul of the Age but was Shakespeare actually Shakespeare? William Shakespeare is the author of 37 plays, over a 150 sonnets and epic poems, inventor of more then 1700 words in the English language. The most performed playwright of all time and yet not a single document exists in his own hand. This class will examine the authorship question delving into aspects of Oxfordian Theory and its fringe counterparts Prince Tudor and Prince Tudor II.


Prerequisites
We will look at evidence from history, the plays, and modern scholarship from Freud to Mark Twain to the Supreme Court. A familiarity with the works of Shakespeare and the authorship question in general is highly recommended though not necessary

C1186: Paradise: Mostly Lost, Somewhat Searched For
Difficulty: *

Utopia, traditionally defined as an "ideal community," literally translates to "no place." Thomas Moore wrote a whole book on the impossibilities of achieving a Utopia and no one believed him. Do you? We'll test your beliefs by fleshing out what is meant by Utopia by examination of historical attempts, representations in classic and modern literature, and varying schools of thought. Also to be considered: is such a community even achievable? What are the ingredients for a utopia?

C1188: Anti- Oppression 101
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Portia Johnson

Do you care about equality and justice? Or want to learn how social injustices are reinforced and what you can do to stop them?

Well, the objective of this class is to teach how systematic oppression takes place and what we can do to fight against it.

Touching on gender, sex, race/ethnicity and class, patterns of oppression will be recognized and deconstructed to offer ways to work towards equalizing the power imbalances in our communities.


Prerequisites
***this class will touch on sensitive topics and have many difficult parts. It is best to enter the discussion in a(n) receptive, supportive, and engaging manner. Students should be willing to interact and participate in learning exercises.

C1195: Reality: Arguments for and Against
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stephen Marrone

What could be more simple and easy than the existence of the world around us? In this class, we’ll explore the ideas of some of the greatest thinkers of all time on the nature of reality; but with a twist. By analyzing the thoughts of Descartes, Hume, Nietzsche, Touring, and more, together with an in-depth look at relevant film clips including Inception, The Matrix, and Star Wars we'll explore how our world could be a dream, a computer, a parallel universe, or maybe (if we’re lucky) real life.

C1198: That conspiracy theory, tho!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Max Worthy

Was the moon landing faked? Are Kanye and Jay-Z illuminati? Are reptiloids from another dimension slowly taking control of our world?

In this discussion-based class, we will attempt to examine the fundamentals of modern conspiracy theories through critical lenses and the tools of skeptics to find out the truth. Moreover, we'll get to the heart of why we believe.


Prerequisites
Excited, pumped, and ready to talk!

C1201: Obamacare 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anna Stapleton

What exactly is all this Obamacare business? We'll start with the basics of health insurance (premiums, deductibles, co-pays, oh my!) then cover the main provisions of the law, making sure to leave time for student questions and discussion on the pros and cons of the law. Disclaimer: you don't have to like Obamacare to like this class, just be ready for a thoughtful debate grounded in the facts.

C1202: Why and How Should We Help People?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Usman Akhter

We've all got our own problems, so why should we care about helping others? Who should we help, and how do we do it? We'll discuss the basis of our moral obligation to help those in need, different conceptions of justice, and effectiveness of the provision of aid.

C1203: Community Organizing 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sofia Flores

In this class we’ll explore the basics of community organizing in the simple yet effective Saul Alinsky format (remember when he threatened to occupy all of the bathroom stalls in O’Hare?). This class will provide you with a foundation to create change. We will try and break down power and explore how to build relationships in order to meet larger goals. Prepare to reflect on your own interest in social justice and what experiences have shaped them.

C1211: Criminal Juries Gone Wild?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Paul Johnson

What is the future of the criminal jury? In the aftermath of the George Zimmerman and Casey Anthony trials, Americans are shaking their heads; and some are nodding. In this class, we’ll be covering the history of juries in America. Are trials more dramatic than actual case law? Who decides the make-up of “the jury”? Are these jurors our peers or their peers? These and other burning questions are only a few of the topics we’ll be covering as “critics” and “supporters” of the jury process.


Prerequisites
A general idea of how individuals are arrested, charged and prosecuted.

C1213: Fortune Telling Around the World
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Abigail Pershing

Ever want to peak into the future? You aren’t the first. Around the world, people have developed various forms of fortune telling to learn more about their lives as well as the lives of others. Join us as we travel through Indian, European, Asian and African culture to learn about the art of Tasseography (reading tea leaves), Palmistry, Throwing Bones, Tarot, and Face Reading .You may even find yourself trying a few of these out before class is over!

C1214: What is Truth?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jan Tabaczynski

What is the truth? Why does it matter? Truth is a law of nature. Like gravity, we feel it as an inescapable and invisible force rooting our ideas and our actions in solid ground. Without truth, there is no agreement or even disagreement. In a two hour discussion you will share your ideas on what truth really is, why it matters, and learn what some important dead old guys had to say about it along the way.

C1239: Living with Stress: Management to Help Create a Better You
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Emily Yi

When times are bringing you down and you feel boggled down by the stress, find fun ways to look at the situation! In this class, you'll be able to learn how to relieve yourself from stress and looking at things more positively.

C1244: The Economics of Sports
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Minjoo Kim

In this class, we will apply economic theory to the world of sports. A little analysis reveals that there is much more going on, for example, than huge dudes ramming into each other in really tight-fitting outfits (i.e. football). Should you go for it on the fourth down or punt? Is there really such a thing as home field advantage? Are the Chicago Cubs doomed forever? We will tackle such questions and discover how economics comes into play.


Sports and Hobbies

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H1172: Bridge: the Most Intriguing Card Game of the Last Millennium
Difficulty: *

Do you enjoy making bets in poker? Do you enjoy working cooperatively? Then bridge is your chance to do both! For over a century, bridge has been one of the favorite card games of intellectual masterminds and a favorite pastime of millions of Americans. Learn the basic strategies of bridge and impress your friends with your amazing card-playing abilities!

H1206: Origami Boxes
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Hilary Noad

Come and learn how to fold squares of paper into beautiful and functional objects! I plan to demonstrate two types of box: a four-pointed star one, and a square one that can have a lid.

H1196: Board Game Strategy
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Hwang

Love table-top games? This class will be a seminar-style discussion and hands-on examination of strategy in several popular games, such as Settlers of Catan, Scrabble, Ticket to Ride and Pentago. Players are encouraged to bring their own games. Student interest will determine which games are covered.

H1228: StarCraft: An Intro to the Pro Scene and Applications
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Thomas Joe

StarCraft is a real-time strategy video game unlike any other. Winning requires not only precise control of individual units, but also skillful control of the army they compose. Both must be done blisteringly fast, and while simultaneously maintaining an entire economy. We'll take a look at some of the best games from both StarCraft I and II, discuss strategy, and watch the tearful celebrations and emotional losses of this epic e-sport. We'll also look at some game theory applications!


Literature, Language, and Writing

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L1147: Constructing a Language
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Gurevitch

People invent new languages for all sorts of reasons. Star Trek uses Klingon to create the atmosphere for its fantasy universe, L. L. Zamenhof created Esperanto to attempt world peace, Suzette Elgin invented Láadan to guess how worldview changes language. This class will go through a couple of basic questions one should think about when trying out this hobby.

L1149: Gesture and Sign Language
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Linda Liu

You're likely aware of using your voice to communicate, but have you ever wondered what your hands might be saying as well? In this class, we will begin with an introduction to co-speech gesture and demonstrate how your hands might reveal more than you imagined. Shifting our focus to sign languages, we then explore sign's relationship to gesture. Along the way, we hope to clear up some common misconceptions about sign language and challenge your view of what constitutes language.

L1148: The Elements of Style: How to Write Like a Boss
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Marvin Espinoza

Learn how to write in the American style: the plain style. Clear. Direct. Brief. And beautiful. As writers, we will practice the plain style and understand what makes clear, cogent writing by applying lessons from Strunk and White's The Elements of Style.


Prerequisites
The want to learn how to write like a boss.

L1161: So You Want to be a Poet? - Composing Found Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ashley Tran

Have you ever thought writing a poem is hard? Would you believe that it isn’t? In this class, students will write found poems – poems that are composed from already existing, non-poetic texts. Together, we will discuss the genre of poetry and how even the newspaper sitting on the table can be a source for beautiful and meaningful poems. By the end of the class, students will leave with a poem of their own to share with the people around them.


Prerequisites
An interest in poetry and big smiles!

L1124: Malay
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Paul Gauthier

In this class we will study the Malay language, one of the simplest and most intuitive languages on earth. It is the major language of Indonesia and Malaysia, making it one of the most widely spoken non-European languages. This class will allow you to break into studying an area of the world not normally encountered in the United States. We will also discuss how Malay fits into a massive language family stretching from Madagascar to Easter Island.


Prerequisites
Students should have studied at least one foreign language.

L1240: Developing Story: A Crash Course in the Art of Writing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lex Obasuyi

Do you find yourself wondering how to liven up your writing? Did you ever think that it could be as simple as turning your piece into a story of its own?This course will focus on the importance of story in writing. It will also explore the function of story in several different mediums and introduce techniques to help improve the writing of both beginning and intermediate writers. Breathe some life into your writing as we explore the elements of creativity and imagination through storytelling.

L1221: The Evolution of the Disney Princess
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Margeaux Perkins

In this discussion-based course, as the title suggests, we will explore the evolution of the concept of the Disney Princess. From passive and beautiful Cinderella to adventurous and gutsy Mulan, we will discuss themes of gender, race, and beauty, how the Disney princess has changed over time, and the effects these role models have on young girls.


Prerequisites
Students must be able to identify, be familiar with and/or have watched Disney movies with the following princesses: Belle, Ariel, Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Jasmine, Pocahontas, Mulan, Rapunzel, Tiana, and Merida.

L1115: All Things Яussian!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sonya Dekhtyar

Ever wondered about that symbol in Toys 'Я' Us? It's actually a Russian letter! Come learn how to say it and the rest of the alphabet, as well as how to communicate the basics of the language. You know it'll impress your friends! Games and treats await!

L1141: Greek Mythology
Difficulty: *
Teachers: David Jaffe

A brief introduction to the pantheon and heroes of Greek (and Roman) mythology. Classical myths, especially those of the Greeks, form the foundation of so much of Western culture, inspiring some of the most iconic art and literature of all time. In this class we'll acquaint ourselves with the major characters and adventures of Greek mythology, providing the background for understanding classical allusions in the process. Featuring: the 12 Olympians, Heracles, the Argonauts, Perseus, Theseus, etc

L1145: From "Buffy" to "The Avengers" : How Joss Whedon Writes Superheroes
Difficulty: *

Joss Whedon, creator of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "Firefly," and writer of the new "Avengers" movie, has often written strong--but complex--heroic protagonists. This course discusses the differences between how his female and male protagonists are written and how they differ from other brands of heroes. We will also talk about certain writing techniques that are unique to Whedon, such as the language he uses in his works as well as how he utilizes pop culture references in his pieces.

L1153: Grammar Smackdown
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alex Beim

In this class, you'll learn all the grammar skills that you need to know for college, and you’ll be able to tackle almost any sentence like a pro.

The beginning of the class will focus on parts of speech, from the simple “verb - it’s what you do” to the indirect object. You’ll learn how to analyze a sentence through diagramming. I bet you didn't expect that you would learn grammar by drawing rocket ships and an Amazon Jungle bug!

L1174: Seussian Parables: The Stories of Dr. Seuss
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jimmy Garcia

Do you like Dr. Seuss but not Nathaniel Hawthorne or any of those other dry authors? Me too! In this short course we will read one of Dr. Seuss's parables (Yertle the Turtle or The Butter Battle Book or something completely different? Who knows? It'll be a surprise) and analyze it afterwards. I hope that after this class you'll have learned some awesome tools for reading and analyzing anything else. Even if anything else means The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, ugh.


Prerequisites
A Brain (New or Slightly Used)


Math and Computers

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M1160: 48÷2(9+3) = ?: A Journey into the Foundations of Arithmetic
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Josh Fry

Try and calculate 48÷2(9+2).

Did you get 2 or 288? Or neither? You might have seen this 'math' problem before on Facebook. Around 2011 it became a glorified meme, causing tons of Interneters to smash their keyboards. In this class we'll explore our concept of arithmetic. I'll offer a mathematical treatment of the foundation of arithmetic (Peano Arithmetic), and using this conceptual/mathematical framework we'll ask what justifications there are for either answer.


Prerequisites
We will only need a firm grasp of middle school arithmetic. However, we will discuss arithmetic at a very abstract level, and that's by no means easy. Anyone who is comfortable with mathematics and likes thinking about it will do well! (Also, knowledge of functions is a huge plus.) P.S. if you want to learn more about the 48÷2(9+3) = ? meme before class, visit http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/48293. We we will go beyond (mathematically and conceptually) what the website says about the two answers differing only because of 'order of operations.'

M1128: How Computers Work and a Guide to Troubleshooting
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bill Geraci

So how *do* computers actually work? We'll start with problems you've had (like computers freezing!) and you'll learn how a computer guy sees computers and their problems. Come learn about "The Seven Levels of Computing"--a framework for knowing what to do when computers don't work correctly. We'll then move to The Standard Answers for problems at each of the seven levels.


Prerequisites
Time working with computers helpful. No technical understanding / training of computers needed.

M1220: Idempotents: Forever Squared
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Geng

$$6^2 = 3\boxed{6}$$
$$76^2 = 57\boxed{76}$$
$$376^2 = 141\boxed{376}$$
Can you find more numbers like this?
Is there a limit to how long they can get?
Can you find any which end in 5 instead?
Can you do this in base 2? Base 12?

In our quest to answer these questions, we’ll get a little glimpse of a kind of math known as "ring theory". (What does this silliness have to do with rings anyway?)


Prerequisites
We’re going to make up new numbers and the methods for adding and multiplying them out of thin air. If you’re not okay with that, maybe this class isn’t for you.

M1119: Raspberry Pi: A Computer that Fits in your Pocket
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Glen Wang

The Raspberry Pi is a computer the size of a credit card that can connect to the Internet, play movies and do other things that a normal computer can do. It was designed by a team of engineers who want to make computers more affordable and accessible around the world. In this class we will look at the Pi, focusing on how each component of a modern computer can be packed in such a small space. For more info, check out http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs

M1171: Think like a Programmer
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Hwang

A hands-on introduction to the thought processes and habits behind computer programming skills. We will discuss programming basics such as variables, logic, data structures, and flow control through the lens of everyday problem solving skills using games and demonstrations.


Prerequisites
No programming experience necessary! :D

M1167: String!
Difficulty: **

Can you untie a knot by tying another knot next to it and canceling them out the way you cancel opposites in math class?

Can you hang a picture on two nails in a wall so that the picture falls down if a single nail--no matter which one--is removed?

How could math possibly help with questions like these? And how could these possibly help with anything people actually do with string?

String will be provided. Bring your own questions too!

M1162: Introduction to Mobile Development
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alan Zhong

Have you ever wondered how apps like Instagram, Candy Crush Saga, or Angry Birds work? In this class I will introduce you to developing apps for Android and iOS. I will teach you the fundamentals of app development and hopefully inspire you to make an app of your own in your spare time.


Prerequisites
Interest in mobile development.

M1185: 21: The Math of Blackjack
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bob Chen

Blackjack, the staple of modern day casinos, movies, and online games. The fate of billions (if not trillions) of dollars has been determined by the flip of the card, or a lucky decision.

However blackjack at it's core is a game of probabilities. This class will introduce you to optimal strategies for playing blackjack including perfect play, card counting, bankroll management and common gambler's pitfalls.


Prerequisites
Experience with probability is highly suggested

M1231: Puzzles!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sachi Hashimoto

Do you like puzzles? Then come solve them with me! We'll work out puzzles like this one:

You are on one side of the river, and you are trying to move a wolf, sheep, and cabbage across the river in your boat. Unfortunately, your boat can only hold you and one other thing (either the wolf, the sheep, or the cabbage). You can't leave the wolf alone with the sheep, or it will eat it, and similarly, you can't leave the sheep alone with the cabbage. How do you get everyone across the river?


Prerequisites
None, just be ready to think about lots of puzzles!

M1150: Infinity: a Mathematical Introduction
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Redmond McNamara

How big is infinity? Are there different kinds of infinity? Is there anything bigger than infinity? How can you measure infinity? I'll try to answer these questions, and a few others, starting from scratch.


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with irrational numbers, like $$\pi$$, $$e$$ or $$\sqrt{2}$$, would be helpful, but is not required.

M1154: The Universal Computer
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nathan Hauke

Think your computer is smarter than you?
Maybe. But with enough space and time, paper and pencil can be just as powerful.
How? With a Turing machine, the world's simplest computer. We will model a Turing machine and complete a few simple tasks.

M1157: What are the odds?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: SANCHIT CHITRE

Are the Bears or the Packers more likely to win the game based on their previous record playing each other? If Mike's mother has 2 M&Ms to give to her children, what are the odds that he would get one knowing that Mike has 3 brothers and 4 sisters? These and many other basic day-to-day questions could be answered by the concepts of probability.

M1182: Mathematical Philosophy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Morales

Are you interested in philosophical concepts such as infinity, truth, logic, and belief? Do you enjoy mathematics? Then this is the class for you. We will cover these concepts and analyze them using mathematics. While the math won't be completely formal/rigorous, it will be fun!

Note: This class is foremost a mathematics class; as such I will only be presenting basic summaries of these philosophical concepts, not detailed accounts.


Prerequisites
High School Mathematics such as Algebra and Geometry (knowledge of sequences/series helps but is not necessary).

M1191: A Handful of Logic Problems
Difficulty: **
Teachers: George Hwang

In our short presentation, we will be going over a handful of logic problems. We will cover some very well known famous problems, as well as some of the lesser known ones. Our goal is to promote critical thinking and analyzing of a situation given the details at hand in order to come out with one, true, logical solution.

M1205: Your Math Teacher Didn't Lie To You - Here's Proof
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Noah Lee

The square root of two is irrational. Yes. But why? 0.9999999999...=1. OK. But why? The Pythagorean Theorem is lovely, but why is it true?

Proofs are the basis for higher level mathematics. Want to take a sneak peek at how to approach these proofs? Then this is the class for you!
Direct proofs, proofs by contradiction, proofs by contrapositive, proofs by induction...This class will let you in on the secrets to mathematical proofs - to prove the obvious, the abstract, and even the absurd.

M1209: Geometry: Beyond Euclid
Difficulty: **

When you think of geometry, what do you envision? If all you think of are triangles and circles, then you’re missing out on what is really cool in geometry. From the liberation of classical geometry by Gauss, Bolyai and Lobachevsky to the Erlanger Program of Felix Klein, be ready to learn about the geometry of REAL mathematicians and physicists, including the geometry Einstein used to describe space!


Prerequisites
Understanding of basic geometry will help, specifically knowledge of Euclid's postulates and axioms.


Science

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S1179: Quantum Information Theory
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Alfred Zong

Have you heard of quantum computers? Have you wondered how they work? In this class, you will be introduced to the theory of quantum information and its application to quantum computation!

In case you're wondering why quantum computers are so cool, think about this: if you have a set of N numbers, a quantum computer can tell whether a given number x is in the set or not without looking at all N numbers, i.e. the complexity is less than O(N)! Come to the class if you want to know the magic!


Prerequisites
Required: love physics and math, familiarity with mechanics (e.g. F=ma), vector, trigonometry and logarithm. Optional: calculus, matrix multiplication, linear operator/transformation, eigenvalue. Not required: quantum mechanics (we'll learn the essentials during the class!)

S1152: Deadly Diseases
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stephen Mchugh

What are the world's deadliest diseases? What makes a disease deadly? Are the deadliest diseases necessarily the most dangerous? In this class we will discuss the most infamous diseases, from bacterial infections such as malaria to more widespread diseases such as the flu, and arrive at answers to the above questions. No bio background is necessary.

S1215: Sensational Failures in Engineering
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Liza Plotnikov

Exploding space shuttles, collapsing bridges, exploding naval guns… sometimes designs fail, and sometimes they fail catastrophically. These failures can be dramatic, deadly, or sometimes just plain silly, but they have one thing in common: they are all preventable. In this class we’ll cover the technical missteps behind some famous engineering disasters (and some you may never have heard of).

S1125: The science of perception
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Paul Gauthier

In this class we will look at how the brain processes information from eyes, ears, and nose. This is not so straightforward as one might think; the brain processes the information it gets using all manner of clever tricks and shortcuts. We will look at some of these techniques and some interesting examples where the brain's shortcuts bring it to the wrong conclusions.

S1137: Divas of Science
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lawrence Chiou

You've all heard of Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, and Galileo Galilei, but what about Rosalind Franklin, Marie Curie, and Ada Bryon? Only 43/863 Nobel Laureates have been women, but they have been rockstars! In this class, we'll talk about the "divas" of science and their amazing discoveries such as the structure of DNA, radioactivity, and the world's first computer programs.

S1133: Citizen's CPR Course
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Deanne Kennedy

Have you ever seen a movie where a character is able to save the life of another person whose heart has stopped beating? In this class, we will present CPR and some other emergency medical techniques that you might have previously seen in movies. We will use our own CPR mannequins and first aid equipment to provide you with some practical knowledge about emergency medical care.

S1222: An introduction to the brain
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Henk Cremers

How does the brain work? It is a question that fascinates scientists from disciplines like biology to philosophy. Here we will first shortly go over brain anatomy and ways you study the brain. After that the focus will be questions on the relation between brain functions and the mind such as: can brain damage change your personality? Are psychiatric disorders brain disorders?

S1236: Fun with Science!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tim Black, Sarah Howell

We’ll look at some strange edge-cases of science. We will demonstrate superconductors that levitate magnets in midair, colorful fire that isn’t orange, materials that behave differently when cooled to 321°F below zero with liquid nitrogen, metal that when bent remembers its original shape, and more!

S1181: Crime Scene Investigation: Science on the Case
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jeremy Ziring

A crime's been committed and its your job to solve it! In this class, we'll have crime scene set up, complete with fingerprints, glass analysis, (fake) blood that needs typing, and more. You'll learn how to perform each of these analyses as you work with our experts to determine who's the culprit. This class will be set up as stations, with instructors at each ready to teach you how to best use the evidence. Are you up to the challenge?

S1212: Red Pandas: The Most Handsome Mammals in Existence
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mark Juhn

Learn about the animal that is "cursed with cuteness"! The red panda's attractive face and prized fur makes them a prime target for hunters and poachers. In the course, we will examine the basic anatomy and behavior of the red panda. We will also focus on the fossil record of these awesome creatures as well as address conservation efforts being done in order to save these endangered animals.

S1194: Electricity: In Theory and Practice
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Robert Wimberly

You use electricity every day when you turn on a light switch, but you probably don't think about how electricity actually works. Did you know that electricity travels at 186,000 miles per second? Or did you know that electricity can pass through your body without harming you? This class will teach the basic theory of electricity along with live demonstrations showing electricity in action.

S1208: Advanced Mechanics
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Lawrence Chiou

Instead of working with Newton's laws directly, a more advanced grounding of mechanics recasts Newton's laws in an equivalent but much more powerful form. Collectively, the so-called Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms provide the theoretical grounding for much of physics as we know it today.

We will derive the so-called Lagrange and Hamilton equations and explain some of their implications on thermodynamics and quantum mechanics.


Prerequisites
AP Physics C or equivalent. (Even if you have not formally taken AP Physics, knowledge of basic calculus and introductory mechanics should suffice.)

S1159: How to break things: An introduction to picking locks
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jim Duehr

Have you ever wondered why only one key will open a locked door?

The class will be about basic lock-picking as a challenge based sport. While requiring analytical skills, dexterity, finesse, and concentration, It also promotes a healthy understanding of security and infrastructure involved in everyday life.

We will teach the basics of locks and the defect which picks exploit, and bring about a refresher on the ethics of locksport as a hobby, and the dangers of malicious use.

S1180: Fun with Goop
Difficulty: *

The physics behind non-Newtonian fluids, fluids that don't respond to applied forces like water does, (such as cornstarch suspended in water, commonly known as oobleck) is still somewhat of a mystery. There is an entire sub-field of physics dedicated to making it less of an enigma! Come listen to a couple of undergrads ramble about soft condensed matter physics and make/play with some oobleck!


Prerequisites
None

S1116: Lightning: Now You See It, Now You Don't. It's Because You're Dead. 101
Difficulty: *

Lightning can strike, anywhere, anytime, and should always strike fear into your heart. Other things it can strike into your heart: huge electric currents and assorted debris. Creative in its methods, lightning can kill you in a total of six differently violent and painful ways. With the basics of electricity, physics, and a touch of biology (just for giggles), we’ll cover the different ways your life could just end, fast as lightning. Remember: even when you think you’re safe, you never are.

S1130: Dinosaurs: Back From the Grave
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stephanie Baumgart

Step into the world of paleontology and learn how we can get a glimpse of life as it was millions of years ago when dinosaurs ruled the planet. We will start with a tour of a world-renowned fossil lab, followed by a brief lecture covering a few basics of paleontology. We also will work on identifying basic bones and rocks as well as learn to create cladograms showing evolutionary relationships between dinosaurs.

S1146: Complete World Knowledge
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Redmond McNamara

Have you ever wondered how many grains of sand there are on all the beaches in the world? Or how much tea there really is in china? Or how many piano tuners there are in Chicago? Stop wondering and learn how to cull the answers from the ethereal mass of knowledge that is YOUR BRAIN!

Come learn about Fermi Problems, an incredible way to estimate these sorts of problems. Back-of-the-envelope calculations have all sorts of applications, and you'll be able to make up statistics on the spot! XD


Prerequisites
Ability to multiply numbers together, given a calculator. Or a smartphone. Or somebody else's smartphone.

S1170: How Stars are Born--And Their Explosive Demises
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Peter Gao

They say we're all made of stardust, and this class explains why it's true. In this class, we'll explore the life cycle of a typical star. You'll learn how stars evolve over time, transforming from young protostars into mysterious black holes. Supernovae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, thermonuclear fusion--this class has it all. If you've ever wondered about how the Sun was formed, you'll love this class.

S1190: HIV/AIDS: The Global Elephant in the Room
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Zack Fowler

This class will examine and explore some of the most shockingly upsetting and encouraging stories based on the spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic around the world. We’ll be watching clips from a number of fantastic movies as well as trying to answer the most critical questions of all: Where did HIV/AIDS come from? Could we have stopped this, and how? What can we do now? All of these questions will be answered from both a social and scientific approach. Come ready to have mind blowing realizations!


Prerequisites
Some basic biology (DNA, Viruses, etc.) is good, but no experience is absolutely fine

S1193: Antarctica: The Story of the Seventh Continent
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Julian Spergel

Antarctica is the coldest, driest, most inhospitable continent, but was it always that way? What is it about this Lovecraftian horror of a continent that has made people want to explore it for the past thousand years? From the mythical man named de Gonneville to the bull-headed royal hydrographer, Alexander Dalrymple, the history of the frozen continent is full of deceit, prostitutes, power-struggles, cute animals getting killed, and lots of blood, like a real-life, frozen Game of Thrones!

S1207: Introduction to Special Relativity
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lawrence Chiou

As Einstein posited at the turn of the last century, if we accept that the speed of light is the universal "speed limit" and that the laws of physics are the same to all inertial observers, then a simple thought experiment reveals stunning inconsistencies in the foundations of Newtonian physics.

Starting with nothing but two simple postulates, we will derive and explain some of the fundamental results of special relativity.